If you have diabetes you know it’s a must to keep your blood sugar levels under control. But do you know what makes them spike?  Blood sugar spikes occur when glucose builds up in your bloodstream.  It is normal for the blood sugar to rise a small amount after eating, even in people who do not have diabetes.

In a recent study conducted by Cornell University, New York and the University of Pisa, Italy, it was apparent that eating protein, fat or even fiber prior to eating carbohydrates causes considerable lower after-meal blood sugars spikes than eating the carbs first.

Three groups of people with Type 2 Diabetes were tested by eating the same meal of bread, juice, meat and green salad.  One group started with the meat and salad, the second started with bread and juice, and third ate everything altogether.

How could changing the order in which we eat change our glucose levels so much? The researchers gave several possible explanations.

People who ate carbs last secreted less insulin. But their glucose was still lower. The researchers believe that this may be due to proteins, fats, and fiber taking longer to digest which slows down the sugar getting into our system.

When we go to restaurants, we may be served a basket of bread before we even place our order.  If you consume the carb or starch you may be right on your way to a big glucose spike before your meal even begins. Consider holding off on the carbohydrates and eat a protein first, then vegetable and then (if you are still hungry) a starch.  Think of bread and butter as your cake with frosting.  Always, eat your sugars last, whether they are fruits or sweets.

Of course, this plan will only take you so far. This will not justify eating a large slice of deep dish pizza after a salad or an extra-large slice of apple pie with ice cream. Lower carb eating is still healthier. Just realize, eating carbs last appears to be better than eating them earlier.